Accommodation Solutions Online

Written Feedback on Progress

Written feedback on progress is a formal form of feedback, either hardcopy or digital that the student is able to review and reflect on at a later time.

Written feedback concerning grades is often more helpful to some students than verbal feedback because it allows them to better monitor and self-regulate their progress. An instructor can provide written feedback on progress through email, on a handout or homework assignment, or through a course management system.

Responsibilities


Student

The student has a responsibility to coordinate with the services for students with disabilities office to determine if written feedback on progress would be an appropriate accommodation, and to communicate with faculty about their needs. Students should also alert the services office if there are any problems with receiving this accommodation.

Faculty

Faculty are responsible for coordinating with the student to provide written feedback on progress that will adequately address the student's needs and maintain their privacy and confidentiality.

Administration

The services for students with disabilities office is responsible for notifying faculty of a student's right to receive written feedback on progress, and for facilitating communication between faculty and the student.

Resources

Related Functional Characteristics

Hearing Loss : Providing written feedback on progress ensures that a student with a hearing loss is provided all the information the instructor intended.

Deafness : Providing written feedback on progress ensures that a student who is deaf can understand instructor feedback.

Working / Short Term Memory Deficit : Written feedback on progress allows students to spend extra time processing feedback in order to retain and learn from it.

Processing Deficit (Auditory) : Written feedback is very important to students with auditory processing deficits in situations where they are not able to take notes themselves concerning their performance and it allows them to reflect and ask questions to improve their performance.

Perseveration : Written feedback on progress allows students to review feedback missed if they have a tendency to perseverate on one idea or statement to the exclusion of other information.

Fluid Reasoning : Written feedback allows students with fluid reasoning deficits time to reflect and analyze their mistakes and their successes so they can fine tune their strategies in future work.

Inability to Comprehend Social Cues : Students who are prone to misperceptions need feedback provided in a written form so they can process and reflect on the feedback before reacting to the person who provided it. Written feedback on progress allows the faculty member to communicate constructive criticism in a way that allows the student time to reflect and process the information.

Obsessive Behavior : Written feedback on progress allows students to review feedback missed while they were persisting in obsessive behaviors.

Anxiety : Students may need written feedback so if an anxiety attack occurs, they will be able to process the feedback after they have recovered.

The Building Accepting Campus Communities (BACC) project was funded by the US Department of Education Office of Secondary Education grant #P333A080070-09. The University of Nebraska does not discriminate based on gender, age, disability, race, color, religion, marital status, veteran's status, national or ethnic origin, or sexual orientation.