Accommodation Solutions Online

Flexibility or Assistance with Assigned Activities

Due to disability or medical needs, there will be some activities or assignments that will need to be altered in terms of when they are done or how they are done. These alterations will be the result of consultation between the student and faculty member with the assistance of the services for students with disabilities office when necessary.

Flexibility with assigned activities may be necessary for many reasons. For example, a student who has speech impairment may need the ability to give speeches only to the instructor rather than the whole class or a student who uses an augmentative speech system may be unable to make an impromptu speech or complete an inclass writing assignment. Depending on the student's disability and the assignment, the instructor might adjust due dates, allow the student to email assignments, provide an alternative activity, or work with the student to find another appropriate accommodation that allows the student to accomplish the essential learning objective of the activity or assignment.

Responsibilities


Student

It is the responsibility of the student to work with the services for students with disabilities office and faculty to find a reasonable alternate assignment.

Faculty

Faculty are responsible for collaborating with the student, in a manner that maintains the student’s privacy, to find an alternative assignment to accommodate the student.

Administration

The services for students with disabilities office is responsible for working with faculty and students to find an alternative assignment, time frame or accommodation to ensure that the student’s right to an equal education is protected.

Resources

Related Functional Characteristics

Motor Skill (Gross Upper) : Students with upper body mobility impairments may not be able to activities that require steady arm control or lifting.

Motor Skill (Gross Lower) : Students may need faculty to be flexible with assigned activities when activities require mobility or balance.

Motor Skill (Fine) : Students may need assistance with tasks requiring fine motor control.

Reach Restriction : Students will need faculty to be flexible if the assigned activities require significant reach (e.g. writing on an overhead, getting supplies off a shelf).

Pain Management : Students may need flexibility in activities so they can fully participate in the experience without pain.

Risk for Injury : Students need faculty to be flexible with assigned activities when the activities would put the student at increased risk for falling, cutting themselves on sharp objects, or other injuries that would require medical attention.

Seizures : Students may need to be able to have alternate activities if an assigned activity could cause a seizure such as a multimedia display that uses flashing lights and loud sounds.

Dietary Needs : If activities involve eating, tasting, or handling food products, modifications may need to be made for students with disability-related dietary needs or restrictions. In the case of severe allergic reactions, access to an alternate way to experience the content may be required.

Climate Sensitivity : Modifications may need to be made for students with climate sensitivity if activities involve exposure to extremes in temperature.

Chemical Sensitivity : Students may need faculty to be flexible with assigned activities to avoid or limit students' exposure to a chemical trigger.

Allergies : Modifications may need to be made for students with severe allergies if activities involve exposure to pollen, mold, animal dander, food product derivatives, or other allergens.

Low Vision : Students may need assistance in laboratories so they can participate in activities that require normal vision.

Contrast Vision Deficiency : Students with contrast deficiencies may need assistance or modifications for activities or demonstrations requiring contrast distinctions

Color Vision Deficiency : Students with color vision deficiencies may need assistance or modifications for activities or demonstrations requiring color distinctions.

Blindness : Faculty may need to be flexible with assigned activities when being unable to see impedes students' ability to do the activity or assignment.

Hearing Loss : Students with hearing impairments may require assistive technology or other assistance if hearing sound is part of the activity, or if inability to hear sounds presents a safety risk.

Deafness : Faculty may need to be flexible with assigned activities when being unable to hear impedes students' ability to do the activity or assignment.

Numbness : It may be necessary to create different activities for students who are unable to feel substances or who cannot trust that they are on steady ground.

Touch Oversensitivity : It may be necessary to create different activities for students who are unable to touch certain substances or cannot participate in certain activities.

Sensory Distractibility : Modifications to activities may be necessary to reduce distractions and safety risks.

Processing Deficit (Language) : As the process of decoding and comprehending text or expressing ideas clearly in writing can be slow and labor intensive for students with language processing deficits, students may need reasonable flexibility with assignments and in class activities.

Intelligibility : Flexibility regarding responding to questions posed in class, or participating in class or group discussions, may be necessary for students who have difficulties with speech intelligibility.

Articulation : Flexibility regarding responding to questions posed in class, or participating in class or group discussions, may be necessary for students who have difficulties with speech articulation.

Obsessive Behavior : Students may require additional time to complete assigned activities due to obsessive rituals or behaviors or for implementing strategies.

Anxiety : Flexibility with assigned activities may be necessary if assigned activities involve anxiety triggers for panic attacks, or if students need additional time to complete activities in order to implement strategies for controlling stress and anxiety related to participation in assigned activities.

The Building Accepting Campus Communities (BACC) project was funded by the US Department of Education Office of Secondary Education grant #P333A080070-09. The University of Nebraska does not discriminate based on gender, age, disability, race, color, religion, marital status, veteran's status, national or ethnic origin, or sexual orientation.